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21

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 1:40pm

Well, there is English, French, Spanish and, of course, German.
Additionally, I could choose Russian, Italian and Latin. But actually I've already enough. ;)
You know, sometimes it's already quite a big problem not to mix up French and Spanish by mistake.
E.g.: - venir (Sp) = venir (Fr) (kommen) - But the word is conjugated absolutely differently.
- vivir (Sp) = vivre (Fr) (leben) - Here the infinitive alone is already completely confusing.

Jean

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22

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 1:42pm

what is this "E.g."? [8)]
"Es gibt so viele Wahrheiten, wie es Menschen gibt" - Ryõji Kaji

23

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 1:44pm

e.g. = "for example" ("zum Beispiel" = z.B.)

soulofimmortal

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24

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 1:45pm

Well, there is English, French, Spanish and, of course, German.
Additionally, I could choose Russian, Italian and Latin. But actually I've already enough. ;)
You know, sometimes it's already quite a big problem not to mix up French and Spanish by mistake.
E.g.: - venir (Sp) = venir (Fr) (kommen) - But the word is conjugated absolutely differently.
- vivir (Sp) = vivre (Fr) (leben) - Here the infinitive alone is already completely confusing.


Yes....I took French Spanish Latin and English. and i mix up everything.
But i think, the easiest one is spanish (of the first free), followed by latin.

Piper

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25

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 1:48pm

@Jean, that means "for example" ;)

@zip, I'm jealous, at our school, there are just English, French and Latin, but Latin is crap, I think... you don't need it and I don't want to study medicin and jura (It is Jura, isn't it? Even Leo doesn't know the correct word).
But my Christmas present will be a Spanish schoolbook, so I will learn Spanish myself. [:D]

Soul, you think Spanish is easier than French? Then I won't have big problems by learning. :)

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26

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 1:52pm

@zip_1: yes, three other languages - thats enough!
the russian language is difficult - we must learn this language from the 5th to the 10th class at school
@piper: jura? i think thats write in english:
  • to read for the bar... or
  • to study the law... (i think thats the right version)

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Michael Otto" (Dec 8th 2007, 1:58pm)


27

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 1:54pm

@soulofimmortal:
I think so as well. French is more difficult than Spanish, which is spoken by so many more people. So I really prefer Spanish. But if you learn all the important details and exceptions it's still a challenge to learn Spanish - especially the imparative. [:D]

[edit]@Piper:
We use the book "Caminos". I can recommend it because the grammar, vocabulary, text and exercise part are all in the same book. [TH] [/edit]

soulofimmortal

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28

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 2:00pm

Yes...I´m just studying spanish since 1 Year so we have only learned the "preterito perfecto" and I was so happy, that theres just one auxiliary verb (haber)

In French i (should) know all tenses. and the whole grammar...
But even though, sometimes it would be much easier to say something in spanish than in French.

Piper

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29

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 2:01pm


to study the law... (i think so)

Ok, thanks :)

@zip: I get a book from "Langenscheidt", extra (?) for people who want to learn it themselves. ;)

If Spanish really is easier than French I will have no problems because I think French is very easy. [:D]

soulofimmortal

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30

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 2:03pm

@ piper: Do you mean: El nuevo curso?
It´s a great book!

31

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 2:05pm

Quoted

I think French is very easy. [:D]
Yeah. Then Spanish won't be any problem for you. ;) But, as already mentioned, it's difficult not to mix it up with French.

Piper

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32

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 2:09pm

@soul, no it's this
The reviews are well, so I think this book will be well too. ;)

@zip, good to hear, I think I will make that. :)

33

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 2:12pm

I don't want to seem to be a know-it-all, but in this case...

Quoted

The reviews are well, so I think this book will be well too.
... the adjective "good" should be used both times.

As you said in your first posting I am just referring to mistakes. ;)

Piper

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34

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 2:14pm

It's ok, I'm never sure, how to use these adjectives. :S

35

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 2:16pm

Doesn't matter. It's a pity that there are no adverbs in German because then it would maybe be a bit easier for us to remember (how) to use them in other languages.

[edit]I mean there are adverbs in German, but not the same way as in English or French for example.[/edit]

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "zip_1" (Dec 8th 2007, 2:59pm)


soulofimmortal

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36

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 2:23pm

It´s quite easy.....You say The reviews are GOOD. But the book is recommanded WELL.

If the adjective belongs to a verb, which is not a form of "to be" you use the adverb.

[offtopic]In german: Bei "to be" kein -ly[/offtopic]

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "soulofimmortal" (Dec 8th 2007, 2:34pm)


Piper

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37

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 2:29pm

Ah, Thank you very much, that was a thing I always wanted to know. [liebhab]

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38

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 2:39pm

Nice thread piper. ;)

Even if my English is quite good I think it can be still improoved. :thumbsup:
Especially the 200 different terms are horrible. I often do not know when I have to use this or that term. Anyone else, who has that problem? [:D]

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39

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 3:00pm

Is anyone else using the dictionary that firefox offers?

You can install an English (or any other language) dictionary from the following site:
https://addons.mozilla.org/de/firefox/browse/type:3

When typing, it will point out mistakes. Very helpful in my opinion.


I've also seen some "its - it's" mistakes in this thread. Just remember:
Use it's when the meaning is supposed to be "it is", "it has" or similar. In this case the ' replaces the missing letters.

examples:
it's been a pleasure - it has been a pleasure
it's late - it is late

Use "its" when it is the possessive form of "it".

example:
the cat is licking its paws (=die Katze leckt ihre Pfoten; Verwendung von it's würde den Satz unsinnig machen etwa: die Katze leckt "sie ist" Pfoten)
Skeleton, you are my friend
And I could never bring your life to an end

40

Saturday, December 8th 2007, 3:02pm

If you mean "expressions" with "terms" I agree with you. English is said to be the language with the biggest vocabulary. For every word there are at least two or three synonyms.